Category: Seafood – A to Z

Abalone

Unlike most other popular molluscs, including Scallops, Oysters and Mussels which are bivalves with two shells hinged together, Abalone has just one shell. Called gastropods or univalves, such single-shelled creatures are often of less culinary interest than their two-shelled cousins, but the 100 or so species of Abalone found around the world are a notable exception.

Abalone – Blacklip

Information on the Blacklip Abalone including buying guide, storing guide, cooking methods, substitutes and more.

Abalone – Greenlip

Information on the Greenlip Abalone including buying guide, storing guide, cooking methods, substitutes and more.

Albacore

Information on Albacore including buying guide, storing guide, cooking methods, substitutes and more.

Bailer Shell

Bailer Shells (Zidoninae subfamily) are large, smooth, cream-coloured, spiral-coiled, oval shells with orange-brown zigzag markings; their name comes from their use for bailing out boats. The most common, false bailer shell with its distinctive orange foot, is harvested off the south-east coast, while a very similar, but less commonly seen, black-footed species is found along the central to north coast of NSW. The larger melon shells are also a member of this group.

Banana Prawns – Indian Banana Prawns

Banana Prawns have a delicious light, sweet flavour that makes them great for hot dishes, especially because their flesh holds well when cooked. They are a great local choice, caught off Northern Australia and you can also purchase farmed Banana Prawns.

Barramundi

This glossary entry for barramundi has information regarding cooking, buying, storing, eating, nutritional data and substitutions.

Billfish

Billfish are popular with game fishermen, but some are also increasingly popular as table fish

Blue Mussels

Information on the Blue Mussels including buying guide, storing guide, cooking methods, substitutes and more.

Blue-Eye Trevalla

Information on the Blue-Eye Trevalla including buying guide, storing guide, cooking methods, substitutes and more.

Caviar

Information article on caviar. The four main types of caviar are Beluga, Sterlet, Ossetra, and Sevruga. The rarest and costliest is from beluga sturgeon that swim in the Caspian Sea, which is bordered by Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia, Turkmenistan and Azerbaijan.

Chūtoro

Chūtoro is usually found near the skin on the back and belly. It combines the lighter but deep, slightly bitter flavour of an akami with the sweet tenderness of an ōtoro. It is quite expensive and usually served only on special occasions.

Coral Trout

Information on Coral Trout including buying guide, storing guide, cooking methods, substitutes and more.

Crab

Crabs are prepared and eaten as a dish in several different ways all over the world. Some species are eaten whole, including the shell, such as soft-shell crab; with other species just the claws and/or legs are eaten. The latter is particularly common for larger crabs, such as the snow crab. Mostly in East Asian cultures, the roe of the female crab is also eaten, which usually appears orange or yellow in colour in fertile crabs.

Darne

A darne is a single-serving portion taken from a thick cross section straight through the backbone of a substantial whole, dressed, round fish, such as salmon or tuna.